October 1, 2014
VIDEO: Cops Break into Home Arrest Innocent Woman For Filming Them

getinvolvedyoulivehere:

VIDEO: Cops Break into Home Arrest Innocent Woman For Filming Them ~ watch it here: http://bit.ly/1BxvQ74

(via truth-has-a-liberal-bias)

October 1, 2014

women-in-music:

Aretha Franklin performing a cover of Adele’s ‘Rolling In the Deep’/’Ain’t No Mountain’ live on Letterman.

(via stareintothemaggotdrawer)

October 1, 2014
themuslimavenger:





I no longer love blue skies. In fact, I now wish for grey skies. 
The drones do not fly when the skies are grey. - Zubair Rehman, after his grandmother was murdered by US drone strikes in Pakistan
Zubair’s sister Nabila holds a photo with a drawing she made depicting a drone strike that killed her grandmother.

themuslimavenger:

I no longer love blue skies.
In fact, I now wish for grey skies.

The drones do not fly when the skies are grey.

- Zubair Rehman, after his grandmother was murdered by US drone strikes in Pakistan

Zubair’s sister Nabila holds a photo with a drawing she made depicting a drone strike that killed her grandmother.

(via whitepeoplestealingculture)

October 1, 2014

How to be a Reverse Racist

(Source: majiinboo, via aznnotwhite)

October 1, 2014
NYPD Officer's Secret Taping Reveals Superior Ordered Him To Stop And Frisk Black Males Ages 14-21

(Source: codelens)

October 1, 2014
Tracee Ellis Ross & The Breakfast Club Discuss 'Black-ish' and Colorblindness

thechanelmuse:

Tracee Ellis RossBlack-ish is a family comedy about a black family. It’s one of the things that’s interesting about the show. We’re not a family who happens to be black. We are a black family dealing with their ish. So although the show is not about being black within the ish, a lot of cultural, identity, race, all those kind of things come up. 

Angela Yee: I think the show would benefit you, DJ Envy.

Tracee: Oh ok.

Angela: Envy doesn’t want his kids to know that they’re black. 

Tracee Ellis Ross: Oh! You don’t want them to know they’re black?! 

DJ Envy: That’s not true.

Angela Yee: Envy doesn’t want black people around them.

Envy: That’s not true.

Tracee: This is fascinating. 

Charlamagne: It’s true to a certain extant.

Tracee: Do you have kids?

Charlamagne: Yes, I have a 6-year-old daughter.

Envy: I have four children and I live in an area where there’s not too many of us there. So my kids are not gonna have that many black friends because there’s not that many black people in my area. 

Charlamagne: I think me and Envy’s mentality is more like your character Rainbow [on the show], in the fact that, we’re not tryna teach them anything. Just let them live. Let them be who they’re gonna be. 

Tracee: Anthony Anderson’s character on the show, he wants them to know where they come from. It really is that internal question that all of us are asking: ‘How do you give your kids more than you had and yet what is it that’s important as a parent to pass on to your children?’ And then at the end of the day, you end up learning from your kid. Because they are the ones living in this different society. It’s kind of a fascinating thing when you talk to young kids and you’re like, ‘Isn’t it extraordinary that we have a black president?’ And they’re like, ‘Why do you keep talking about the fact that he’s black? Why do you sound racist?’

Envy: My kids don’t care if Barack Obama is black, they don’t care what he is, he’s just a person and that’s what I love. That’s why I didn’t get as a kid. When I grew up in Queens, it was, ‘We’re black, we stay together,’ but my kids don’t care. They play with Tommy, they play with Jennifer, and Michelle.

Tracee: I understand, but then I have a question: So it is always a point though when it’s whether you’re pulled over, driving while black or when a Ferguson situation where there is a moment as a parent that you do want your child to understand the legacy of what we come from and how that does impact the decisions we make and possibly how you need to navigate the reality of the world. And yet, it is our children who are going to start to change the perspective so that hopefully these are not things we have to deal with, but we’re not quite there yet. I think that’s what the show straddles; it’s a comedy but we really are dealing with those issues.

Charlamagne: I like the show because it shows that racism is a learned behavior. Like the kids on the show, they really have no clue about race, but Anthony Anderson’s is tryna instill it in them like—

Angela: [chimes in] Yeah but until somebody calls you the n-word one day and you’re like ‘what?’ I grew up in a black neighborhood and then I ended up going to private school in seventh grade where there were barely any black kids and there was a lot of racism I never had to deal with before. They were writing the n-word in the locker room, sending out racist Valentine’s Day cards.

Tracee: I think a show like Black-ish allows us to show us having these conversations. A lot of times, race is a hard thing to talk about because everybody has a different experience of it and it’s a hot topic issue because there’s some real stuff around it. So to be able to have these conversations, I think is really important. Otherwise, I think people shy away from the conversations, so hopefully this is the kind of show that is the water cooler talk.

Charlamange: You’re a biracial woman. Did you have any identity issues growing up?

Tracee: No. I don’t know if it’s just the perspective that my mother raised me with, but being of mixed heritage was really exciting to me as a kid. I felt really excited that when I went over my dad’s house there was a Christmas tree in the living room and a menorah in the kitchen. I found that it really gave me an opportunity to connect with what was the same about me and somebody else. It made me comfortable in all environments. I do like, within the context of this show, Pops’ point of view, the Laurence Fishburne’s character that’s very old school, Dre [Anthony Anderson’s character] who kind of straddles that, and the kids who are very colorless in the way they see, Rainbow is right in the middle. She’s more colorful. It’s not that she’s looking for a colorblind or a colorless world. It’s actually a world that has all of it. That a good thing and the beauty of this country, honestly. 

Charlamage: Was there ever a moment when you were made aware that you were black? 

Tracee: First of all, I’ve never known that I wasn’t black.

Charlamagne: Like in a negative moment.

Tracee: I’ve had moments; I had moments where the cab has pulled up and pulled away, especially if my hair is out. They get a little closer and keep on moving. For some reason, I can’t think of stuff now but I’ve always known I was black. In an interview recently, someone said, ‘So as a mixed woman, why is it that you identify as a black woman?’ If I thought I could try being a white woman for a day and say that maybe I would. I was like, ‘I don’t know if anyone would buy it. No, no, no I’m white. I’m very tan…very tan. I get a perm.’ [laughs]

I will never understand why there are parents who don’t feel the need to talk to their children about race as if it doesn’t exist, it doesn’t matter, and it’s a bad thing. It’s important! Raising children with rose tinted glasses causes more harm than good on one’s identity as they grow, and goes hand in hand with culture, representation, and, most of all, history. There is nothing wrong with having differences. Kids are curious and love to learn. Race as well as ethnicity allows them to connect with other kids who are of the same race or ethnicity as them and learn about kids of other races and ethnicities (if they are taught in that manner) that differ from them but can still share similar likes and dislikes with them. Granted, there are kids that don’t speak in color—black and white—but they do speak in shades—lighter and darker. When kids are small they use all types of crayons to color people. However, by the time they begin grade school, they use crayons that are similar to skin tones. There’s no need to raise them in a fantasy world until something happens: they’re called a racial slur, they’re bullied because of the color of their skin, etc. This should be slowly instilled in them when they are young, bit by bit, so they can learn and grasp it over time, but not drilled in them so they can still be kids.

(via dynastylnoire)

October 1, 2014

dynastylnoire:

that-stupid-tardis-sound:

that-stupid-tardis-sound:

one time when my dad was in college these guys found a carpet on the sidewalk and they needed furniture for their dorm so they were like “hell yeah free carpet” and they carried the carpet upstairs and it was really wet and heavy so they unrolled it to let it dry and a dead body fell out

I’M NOT SHITTING YOU

image

WOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOW

October 1, 2014
thepeoplesrecord:

Detroit water shutoffs continue after judge says poor have no right to waterSeptember 29, 2014
U.S. Bankruptcy Judge Steven Rhodes on Monday refused to block the city from shutting off water to delinquent customers for six months, saying there is no right to free water and Detroit can’t afford to lose the revenue.
Rhodes’s order served as a stinging rejection of arguments made by thousands of protesters who staged rallies last summer fighting shutoffs and argued that there is a fundamental right to water service.
"There is no such right or law," Rhodes said.
A six-month ban on water shut-offs would boost the rate of customer defaults and threaten Detroit’s revenue, the judge added.
"The last thing (Detroit) needs is this hit to its revenues," the judge said.
Rhodes issued his ruling after two days of hearings last week and said he lacked the power to issue a water shut-off moratorium. Regardless, a lawyer for 10 residents failed to convince him there was justification for such a drastic step, he said.
Rhodes said residents do not have a right to receive water service “let alone service based on an ability to pay.”
Alice Jennings, an attorney representing the 10 residents fighting water shutoffs, said she was “disappointed but not surprised” by the judge’s ruling. Rhodes, she said, missed the issue of safety and underscored the irreparable harm that comes with the shutoffs.
"We will be looking at an appeal," Jennings said. "We believe there is a right to water and there is a right to affordable water."
The city’s policy of shutting off water to residents in one of the nation’s poorest cities briefly overshadowed the city’s historic bankruptcy case and debt-cutting plan, which hinges on spinning off the Detroit Water and Sewerage Department to suburban counties.
The city started a more vigorous shut-off campaign in the spring compared to other years in an effort to get more people to pay their outstanding bills or get on a payment plan. Rhodes on Monday called the efforts a “bold, commendable and necessarily aggressive plan.”
About 24,000 city water accounts have been shut off this year. A month-long moratorium halting shutoffs ended in August and crews are now back to shutting off water to up to 400 accounts a day, DWSD officials said last week.
Residents, civic groups, and “The Avengers” actor Mark Ruffalo participated in mass protests in recent months fighting the city’s treatment of delinquent water customers. A pocket of protesters lined West Lafayette Boulevard outside federal court Monday.
Ten residents requested the moratorium, saying it would give the city time to establish a plan to better help those who can’t afford to pay their water bills. Lawyers for Detroit say such an order would encourage further delinquency, cause the department to lose revenues and lead to higher rates.
During closing arguments, Jennings argued the “hodgepodge” of programs designed to aid a limited group of residents facing water shut-offs isn’t good enough for the city plagued by widespread poverty.
Jennings told the judge that a “very brief” stop to shut-offs would give the city more time to craft a cohesive program.
Tom O’Brien, an attorney for the water department, has countered that a 10-point plan to educate and assist low-income residents wasn’t constructed overnight.
"It was developed," he said, and "was intended to be practical."
O’Brien also played up a fund outlined in the plan, and a separate pot of annual aid money called for in a proposed Great Lakes Water Authority.
"That’s significant money, it goes a long way," he said.
Detroit’s bankruptcy trial, meanwhile, resumes Monday, five days after City Council members reclaimed power over city government while agreeing to keep Emergency Manager Kevyn Orr in place for bankruptcy-related duties.
The deal means council will resume control over city departments, contracts and other day-to-day matters. Orr’s official removal will be effective if the city’s debt-cutting bankruptcy plan is confirmed.
Orr is expected to testify soon about the debt-cutting plan.
SourcePhoto

thepeoplesrecord:

Detroit water shutoffs continue after judge says poor have no right to water
September 29, 2014

U.S. Bankruptcy Judge Steven Rhodes on Monday refused to block the city from shutting off water to delinquent customers for six months, saying there is no right to free water and Detroit can’t afford to lose the revenue.

Rhodes’s order served as a stinging rejection of arguments made by thousands of protesters who staged rallies last summer fighting shutoffs and argued that there is a fundamental right to water service.

"There is no such right or law," Rhodes said.

A six-month ban on water shut-offs would boost the rate of customer defaults and threaten Detroit’s revenue, the judge added.

"The last thing (Detroit) needs is this hit to its revenues," the judge said.

Rhodes issued his ruling after two days of hearings last week and said he lacked the power to issue a water shut-off moratorium. Regardless, a lawyer for 10 residents failed to convince him there was justification for such a drastic step, he said.

Rhodes said residents do not have a right to receive water service “let alone service based on an ability to pay.”

Alice Jennings, an attorney representing the 10 residents fighting water shutoffs, said she was “disappointed but not surprised” by the judge’s ruling. Rhodes, she said, missed the issue of safety and underscored the irreparable harm that comes with the shutoffs.

"We will be looking at an appeal," Jennings said. "We believe there is a right to water and there is a right to affordable water."

The city’s policy of shutting off water to residents in one of the nation’s poorest cities briefly overshadowed the city’s historic bankruptcy case and debt-cutting plan, which hinges on spinning off the Detroit Water and Sewerage Department to suburban counties.

The city started a more vigorous shut-off campaign in the spring compared to other years in an effort to get more people to pay their outstanding bills or get on a payment plan. Rhodes on Monday called the efforts a “bold, commendable and necessarily aggressive plan.”

About 24,000 city water accounts have been shut off this year. A month-long moratorium halting shutoffs ended in August and crews are now back to shutting off water to up to 400 accounts a day, DWSD officials said last week.

Residents, civic groups, and “The Avengers” actor Mark Ruffalo participated in mass protests in recent months fighting the city’s treatment of delinquent water customers. A pocket of protesters lined West Lafayette Boulevard outside federal court Monday.

Ten residents requested the moratorium, saying it would give the city time to establish a plan to better help those who can’t afford to pay their water bills. Lawyers for Detroit say such an order would encourage further delinquency, cause the department to lose revenues and lead to higher rates.

During closing arguments, Jennings argued the “hodgepodge” of programs designed to aid a limited group of residents facing water shut-offs isn’t good enough for the city plagued by widespread poverty.

Jennings told the judge that a “very brief” stop to shut-offs would give the city more time to craft a cohesive program.

Tom O’Brien, an attorney for the water department, has countered that a 10-point plan to educate and assist low-income residents wasn’t constructed overnight.

"It was developed," he said, and "was intended to be practical."

O’Brien also played up a fund outlined in the plan, and a separate pot of annual aid money called for in a proposed Great Lakes Water Authority.

"That’s significant money, it goes a long way," he said.

Detroit’s bankruptcy trial, meanwhile, resumes Monday, five days after City Council members reclaimed power over city government while agreeing to keep Emergency Manager Kevyn Orr in place for bankruptcy-related duties.

The deal means council will resume control over city departments, contracts and other day-to-day matters. Orr’s official removal will be effective if the city’s debt-cutting bankruptcy plan is confirmed.

Orr is expected to testify soon about the debt-cutting plan.

Source
Photo

(via theyalwayswantyoutoproveit)

October 1, 2014
"Whenever I hear the "Women are paid $.78 for the man’s $1" I flip it around.

Men make $1.22 for every woman’s $1.

It interests me that even the most common simple measure of gender inequality is firmly based on male-as-normative …"

bisexual activist and queer theory blogger Patrick RichardsFink 

this is an interesting point, although mathematically inaccurate: assuming the women:men, 0.78:1 ratio is correct, men make $1.28 for every woman’s $1

A white man makes $1.34 for every dollar that a black man makes

A white man makes $1.52 for every dollar that a latino man makes

A white man makes $1.24 for every dollar that a white woman makes

A white man makes $1.44 for every dollar that a black woman makes

A white man makes $1.67 for every dollar that a latina woman makes

That’s some bullshit right there.

Let’s take it a step further. For every hour a white man works, a black woman has to work 86 minutes to earn as much money. 57.6 hours a week compared to the white man’s 40.

Take it another step further. Assuming a Monday through Friday, 9 to 5 job, from Thursday 12:45pm through Friday end of business, a white man gets paid for his work, a black woman is, by comparison, working for free.

(via quentintortellini)

THE LAST LINE

(via covenesque)

This. I am tired of seing this numbers without thinking about woc. (via arobynsong)

(Source: fliponymous, via hatsnatcher)

October 1, 2014

socialjusticekoolaid:

Last Night in Ferguson (9.29-9.30): Protesters gathered yet again, in a truly uplifting night of action and calls for justice. It wasn’t all sunshine and roses, due to the usual antagonism from the police, but it was solidarity at it’s finest. #staywoke #farfromover

Keep up with the action tonight. Follow the Argus Livestreams and/or BellaAiko from Occupy Oakland.

(via locomotives)

October 1, 2014
"This is why those pious calls to “respect the law,” always to be heard from prominent citizens each time the ghetto explodes, are so obscene. The law is meant to be my servant and not my master, still less my torturer and my murderer. To respect the law, in the context in which the American Negro finds himself, is simply to surrender his self-respect."

— James Baldwin (via jessehimself)

(via talesofthestarshipregeneration)

October 1, 2014
trebled-negrita-princess:

foreignblossom:

shots fired

trebled-negrita-princess:

foreignblossom:

shots fired

(Source: phroyd, via theroyalbadness)

October 1, 2014

swallowthatshit:

brownglucose:

blackgirlsbeauty:

Generations

Her mama don’t look a day over 33

Gene game skrong

(via theroyalbadness)

October 1, 2014

(Source: sandandglass, via punwitch)

September 30, 2014

theapplication:

nevver:

Unpaid Internships, Matt Bors (wait, there’s more)

KEEP READING!

(via wondrousexplosion)

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