September 18, 2014

Josephine Baker in “Princesse Tam-Tam" (1935)

(Source: poehlerized, via captainsaveyamammy)

September 18, 2014
naturalblkgirlsrock:

Steven Ledell Photography

naturalblkgirlsrock:

Steven Ledell Photography

(via naturalbelle)

September 18, 2014

beadedwaist:

So you understand that little white girls seeing only thin white girl’s being showcased, praised and adored, can fuck them up. But you don’t get why Black and Brown kids seeing white faces constantly is a problem. Okay.

September 18, 2014
cryschanelle:

KIRA F2014 🌿
www.kirathelight.com

cryschanelle:

KIRA F2014 🌿

www.kirathelight.com

September 18, 2014
cardiac-almanac:

Important.

cardiac-almanac:

Important.

(via crystalitesummerstar)

September 18, 2014
"American culture is obsessed with transgression and to the degree that blackness remains a primary sign of transgression. One could talk about American mainstream culture as being obsessed with blackness, but it is blackness primarily in a commodified form that can then be possessed, owned, controlled, and shaped by the consumer… and not with engagement in Black culture that might require one to be a participant, therefore to be in some way transformed by what you are consuming as opposed to being merely a buyer. Anecdotally, that to me is the difference between a young white male from the suburbs who’s consuming Black music in the form of rap and who’s wearing the same kind of clothes as the hip-hop musicians, but then in fact when he encounters a young black male on the streets, feels the same racialized fear and demonizes that person as any white person who’s had no contact with that music. So, there’s no correlation often between the consumption of the commodity that is blackness and the culture from which that commodity comes, or provides the resource base.

And again, that’s no different from third-world countries. There’s a way in which white culture is perceived as too “wonder bread” right now—not edgy enough, not dangerous enough—let’s get some of those endangered species people to be exotic for us. It’s really simply a more up-scale version of primitivism resurging. When blackness is the sign of transgression that is most desired, it allows whiteness to remain static, to remain conservative, and it’s conservative thrust to go unnoticed. So, as we’re having a mounting fascism in the United States, that is perpetuated increasingly by young, moneyed, liberal white people, if they’re wearing Black clothes or listening to Black music, they can be perceived as transgressive, as radical, when in fact we see a separation between material aspirations and cultural and social interest. So, at any point in time, they can drop their interest in blackness and do whatever they need to do to reinforce their class interest—the interest of white supremacy, the interest of capitalism and imperialism."

— bell hooks, Cultural Criticism  (via marginaliaetalia)

(via sheilastansbury)

September 18, 2014
jodywatley:

Thank you @ebonymagazine for including me - @jodywatley on your Top 25 Black Music Style Icons - very honored to be on the list and to receive the acknowledgement ❤️✨💃#JodyWatley #itsinthemusic #fashion #style #independent #icons #trendsetters #music #popculture #streetstyle

jodywatley:

Thank you @ebonymagazine for including me - @jodywatley on your Top 25 Black Music Style Icons - very honored to be on the list and to receive the acknowledgement ❤️✨💃#JodyWatley #itsinthemusic #fashion #style #independent #icons #trendsetters #music #popculture #streetstyle

September 18, 2014

sanziene:

Breakfast around the world

What do you eat for breakfast?

(via invisiblelad)

September 18, 2014

(Source: loveknotts, via naturalbelle)

September 18, 2014
"We [Germans] feel tied to Christian values. Those who don’t accept them don’t have a place here."

— Angela Merkel, explaining her views on why multiculturalism in Germany has “failed, totally (via bastardplanet)

(via mochente)

September 18, 2014
Mike Brown’s shooting and Jim Crow lynchings have too much in common. It’s time for America to own up

Not terribly long ago in a country that many people misremember, if they knew it at all, a black person was killed in public every four days for often the most mundane of infractions, or rather accusation of infractions – for taking a hog, making boastful remarks, for stealing 75 cents. For the most banal of missteps, the penalty could be an hours-long spectacle of torture and lynching. No trial, no jury, no judge, no appeal. Now, well into a new century, as a family in Ferguson, Missouri, buries yet another American teenager killed at the hands of authorities, the rate of police killings of black Americans is nearly the same as the rate of lynchings in the early decades of the 20th century.

(Source: azspot)

September 17, 2014

bio-mechanic:

wild-devil-fox:

allblackpeopleeverythang:

Afro Mexican people

Sorry, but we Mexcans we just called them mexicans… 

And us Afromexicanxs from the Costa Chica (where these people pictured are from) refer to ourselves as “negrxs”, “morenx”, and yes “afromexicanx” as well.

(via daniellemertina)

September 17, 2014
invisiblelad:

thisradicalchange:


We didn’t know that our activism and our peaceful displays would result in guns literally looking down our eyes. Literally looking down our eyes. Guns.
And I had young people who were willing to die. For justice. 
I had a young person — and he’s definitely the example of many young people that I represent who said "I didn’t think I would make it to twenty-one years old so I’m ready to die now. Let’s do it now."

State senator Maria Chappelle-Nadal (@MariaChappelleN) speaks on the Senate floor about the events she witnessed in Ferguson, Missouri in the weeks following the execution of Mike Brown. Senator Chappelle-Nadal was one of many protesters tear gassed for three hours without reprieve by the Ferguson PD.
She has been consistent and unrelenting in her criticism of Governor Jay Nixon — to the point of tweeting him “FUCK you, Governor!” — for his lack of action over the violation of citizens’ constitutional right to peacefully protest, and passionately vocal about the violent ways in which protesters were abused by the police.
Full video of Senator Chappelle-Nadal’s speech is available for download here (.wmv format). 

This woman is an inspiration. 

invisiblelad:

thisradicalchange:

We didn’t know that our activism and our peaceful displays would result in guns literally looking down our eyes. Literally looking down our eyes. Guns.

And I had young people who were willing to die. For justice.

I had a young person — and he’s definitely the example of many young people that I represent who said "I didn’t think I would make it to twenty-one years old so I’m ready to die now. Let’s do it now."

State senator Maria Chappelle-Nadal (@MariaChappelleN) speaks on the Senate floor about the events she witnessed in Ferguson, Missouri in the weeks following the execution of Mike Brown. Senator Chappelle-Nadal was one of many protesters tear gassed for three hours without reprieve by the Ferguson PD.

She has been consistent and unrelenting in her criticism of Governor Jay Nixonto the point of tweeting him “FUCK you, Governor!” — for his lack of action over the violation of citizens’ constitutional right to peacefully protest, and passionately vocal about the violent ways in which protesters were abused by the police.

Full video of Senator Chappelle-Nadal’s speech is available for download here (.wmv format). 

This woman is an inspiration. 

September 17, 2014
Robin Thicke Throws Pharrell Under The Bus, Pharrell Blames 'Reverse Racism'

dynastylnoire:

queenofthesideeye:

Even fair weather fans of Robin Thicke have long known that Alan Thicke’s boy had a huge crush on Marvin Gaye’s music. Before “Blurred Lines” took over radio and various cookouts across the country last year, he was releasing albums like 2008’s Something Else, which could’ve also been titled Vanilla Latte Marvin Gaye. Thicke has been doing this, only never to the success he secured with his now lawsuit-spawning massive hit.

However, thanks to the newly exposed depositions as part of the lawsuit filed by Gaye’s children against the “Blurred Lines” architects – Thicke, Pharrell Williams, and T.I. – we now know that Thicke lied about the songs conception. Claiming the stories he told the press last year were sponsored by Vicodin and alcohol, Thicke clarified by explaining,

I was jealous and I wanted some of the credit … I tried to take credit for it later because [Williams] wrote the whole thing pretty much by himself and I was envious of that.

Robin did what many contemporary singers do these days: add their name to the songwriting credits for the sake of appearances and publishing checks. When asked about this, Pharrell noted,

This is what happens every day in our industry. You know, people are made to look like they have much more authorship in the situation than they actually do. So that’s where the embellishment comes in.

Walmart 2014 Shareholders' MeetingAnd if Pharrell is comfortable with that and allowing Thicke to collect 18 to 22 percent of publishing royalties, so be it. As for as the Gaye family’s lawsuit, that is for the courts and possibly Gaye’s ghost to decide. What frustrates me most about this new twist to the story though, is that Pharrell once again spewed that post-racial, Yoda-like nonsense about race – only now under oath.

When trying to break down what exactly makes Marvin Gaye’s “Got To Give It Up” different from “Blurred Lines,” Pharrell said:

Because it’s the white man singing soulfully and we, unfortunately, in this country don’t get enough — we don’t get to hear that as often, so we get excited by it when the mainstream gives that a shot. But there’s a lot of incredibly talented white folk with really soulful vocals, so when we’re able to give them a shot — and when I say ‘we,’ I mean like as in the public gives them a shot to be heard, then you hear the Justin Timberlakes and you hear the Christina Aguileras and you hear, you know, all of these masterful voices that have just been given, you know, an opportunity to be heard because they’re doing something different.

So, Robin Thicke used his clout as an artist to collect 18 to 22 percent of royalties for a song he played no role in actually creating, but when met with a legal challenge, now suddenly wants to deflect and be honest in the name of self-interest. And even when met with a backhand shot of disloyalty, Pharrell acts as if Robin Thicke is a victim because he’s just a white man in America trying to ride the wave of Black creativity to net wealth.

This is like Janet Jackson and Justin Timberlake redux, but at least Damita Jo knew what the damn deal was.

I don’t know what planet Pharrell Williams lives on, but I wish he would jump on his big ass hat and ride himself back there and spare us all from another densely worded statement about race…

I was saying this yesterday. He’s saying everything in this article to try to get out of the law suits and it’s just not going to happen.

(via commiphora)

September 17, 2014

nokiabae:

MOKO  // Your Love [x]

(via nocturnalphantasmagoria)

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